November Collaborative Report

by Jackie Piro Huyck, Soroptimist International of Vista and North County Inland

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November 1, 2018, Vista, CA — November’s meeting of the North County San Diego Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative at United Methodist Church of Vista was well attended and featured guest speaker Jamie Quient, Esq., founder of Free to Thrive.

After sign-ins and refreshments, Kaye Van Nevel of Soroptimist International of Vista and North County Inland started the meeting with several announcements.

NEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • The California Senate has passed legislation appropriating $10 million in fiscal year 2018-2019 to provide services for survivors of human trafficking. This year’s funding will augment the Human Trafficking Victim Assistance Fund and allow organizations (like North County Lifeline in Vista) to continue to offer specialized services such as case management, counseling, legal assistance, social services, shelter and housing assistance to trafficking victims.
  • Soroptimist of Vista/NCI’s 13th Annual Human Trafficking Awareness Walk will be held  January 12, 2019 from 12:30 pm to 3 pm at the Wave Waterpark entrance in Vista. Joseph Travers will be one of the guest speakers before the walk.
  • Jamie Quient’s Free to Thrive is holding a fundraiser on Thursday, November 8 from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm at the Mission Brewery, 1441 L Street, San Diego. Tickets available at freetothrive.org/tickets
  • Kaye has free luncheon tickets for anyone interested in attending a Soroptimist lunch meeting the third Friday of each month at noon at Shadowridge Golf Club in Vista (see soroptimistvista.org) or email soroptimistinternationalvista@gmail.com if you are interested.
  • Randa Krakow of United Methodist Church in Encinitas has a great lending library of books pertaining to human trafficking.
  • Kaye will attend the Vista Chamber’s Government Affairs Committee meeting Nov. 1 where the guest speaker is Don Stump of North County Lifeline; he’ll be speaking about Project LIFE.
  • Jamie Johnson of Sisters of the Streets still needs donations of toiletries for her Purses Project.
  • Holly Herring of Leap to Success announced she wants to open a women’s shelter in North County for victims of violence.
  • The next Collaborative meeting will be January 3, 2019 at 9 am, same place.

How Free To Thrive Helps Trafficking Victims

2018.JamieQuiantEsqGUEST SPEAKER Attorney Jamie Quient was introduced. Her Free To Thrive organization offers free legal services to victims of human trafficking. She decided to form Free to Thrive while she was working at the law firm Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch and taking on pro bono cases for them. Jamie identified a need for legal services for survivors of human trafficking, because there was nothing out there for them specifically at the time.

“When you find out what you’re meant to do in life, the Universe conspires to make it happen,” Jamie observed. At the time, she had a pro bono case with a trafficked victim who she said is doing well now, but at the time had legal issues she needed to clear up. This victim went to court on her own to clear up the issues but there was a bench warrant out for her and she was arrested and sent to Las Colinas jail. These are the kinds of clients that Free to Thrive helps.

Jamie explained that even with legal help and getting a dismissal of charges, “dismissal” is just an expungement of the client’s record, but the record remains searchable as a barrier to employment and other things. Her client would apply and interview for a job, get it, and then the employer would revoke the job offer when they saw she had a criminal record. This particular client was on the Dean’s List at school but it didn’t matter, she just couldn’t get a job because of her record.

Then Jamie heard a speaker from Brooklyn Law School talk about New York’s “vacatur” law to completely and irrevocably clear criminal records and give survivors a clean slate. New York and 10 other states have it. As president of the Lawyers Club of San Diego, Jamie spearheaded the creation of the club’s Human Trafficking Collaborative (HTC) arm. HTC has grown to over 250 members and now produces regular trainings for attorneys and an annual Legislative Roundtable. HTC spearheaded the passage and signing of  California’s own vacatur law (Penal Code 236.14) that provides restorative justice to human trafficking victims by removing any trace of related criminal charges from their record.

Once that law was in place, Jamie said, it opened up an entirely new area of legal work. She quickly filled out the necessary paperwork to form her own pro bono legal services organization for Human Trafficking survivors. It was approved before she had even gotten it off the ground, and she described the next year as “running a marathon while putting on your shoes” as she jumped through all the hoops needed to start the non profit, while the phones were ringing off the hook for her services. But she describes it as the “best job I ever had.”

logo-free-to-thriveShe modeled her organization as a traditional legal service provider with a permanent staff plus volunteer lawyers. She made it a 501(c)(3) but kept in mind the other two models she could have adopted but chose not to (Law School Clinic for students or Law Firm taking on commitment to do pro bono work). She came up with a process so that survivors don’t have to retell their whole life story over and over, which re-traumatizes them. She calls it “trauma informed lawyering” – and said there was no existing training for lawyers on how to work with trauma survivors. Jamie and her team created a holistic, mobile (county-wide) on-call clinic connected to anti trafficking organizations like Alabaster Jar, North County Lifeline, La Maestra, Grace House, etc. She said although her office is down in San Diego, she’s up in North County San Diego all the time.

Once a client is connected to a case manager, her team does a needs assessment. For instance, is the client homeless? etc. They strive to find out what their basic needs are first, and then only after those needs are addressed do they explore their legal needs, like child custody, credit issues, psychological issues, divorce, etc. The survivor is asked “What are your hopes and dreams for the future?”

Jamie said she measures success on whether her organization has helped her clients achieve THEIR goals. Particularly in cases where the client is in jail, Free to Thrive makes sure to assign a case manager BEFORE they are released, so that they don’t just disappear after release. For instance, they will make sure incarcerated clients have a housing program waiting for them when they’re released from jail. Jamie said it commonly takes months before these women are ready to talk about legal issues.

Jamie said she does not look at her clients based on their past records, but instead sees their potential going forward. She asks herself: What is this person going to be five to 10 years from now? That is what she envisions when she looks at them and that is what drives her. She said the hardest issues her group deals with are the ones involving children. The current system sees her clients as unfit parents (because of prior prostitution, drug addiction, terminated parental rights). She said she has seen cases where the dad was the trafficker and he ended up getting custody! She said child custody cases can drag on for years and years.

Jamie’s goal now is to expand her organization to help more victims, and also to have more lawyers nation-wide duplicate what she is doing. She sees a great need across the United States for the services she is providing.

Jamie would like to raise enough money from the funding community to increase her staff. Currently she has a team of two part-time staff attorneys and 1 part-time administrative assistant and 22 pro bono lawyers and a team of law students. She needs more help and funding and she mentioned the fundraiser on November 8 down at the Mission Brewery (see freetothrive.org/tickets).

For more information about Free to Thrive, visit their website at FreeToThrive.org

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The North San Diego County Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative is a Program of Service of Soroptimist International of Vista and North County Inland in partnership with United Methodist Church of Vista. The Collaborative is a diverse group of individuals and community organizations committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking. Our Collaborative Meetings are held bi-monthly on the first Thursday of the month from 9 am to 10:30 am in the at the Church’s Fellowship Hall (lower level) at 490 S. Melrose Drive, Vista. Admission is free and all are welcome. Complimentary coffee and pastries will be available.

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Jamie Quient to Speak at November 1st Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative Meeting

Contact: Kaye Van Nevel at kgvn@cox.net or Jackie Piro Huyck at jackiepiro@gmail.com

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Jamie Quient, Esq.

October 21, 2018, Vista, CASoroptimist International of Vista and North County Inland will host the North County Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative meeting on Thursday, November 1st. 2018, 9 a.m., at United Methodist Church of Vista, 490 S. Melrose Ave., Vista. The event is free to the public, and coffee and pastries will be provided.

The guest speaker will be Jamie Quient, Esq. President and Managing Attorney at “Free to Thrive,” a nonprofit organization that empowers survivors of human trafficking in their journey to becoming thrivers, while providing hands-on experiential learning opportunities to law and graduate students. Prior to launching Free to Thrive in 2017, Jamie practiced civil litigation for five years at Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch LLP. Jamie was the 2016-2017 president of Lawyers Club of San Diego and founded the Lawyers Club Human Trafficking Collaborative.
For more information contact kgvn@cox.net or visit soroptimistvista.org.
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ABOUT SOROPTIMISTS OF VISTA and NORTH COUNTY INLAND:
Soroptimist of Vista and North County Inland (SI Vista NCI) was chartered on March 23, 1953. We are a dynamic group of professional business women who seek to make a difference in our community through offering scholarships and grants to local charities and by raising awareness and educating the public about issues affecting women and girls, such as domestic violence and human trafficking. Funds are raised through our annual salad luncheon for the public and other group and personal projects. For over 60 years in service, we have been committed to protecting the environment, education in the fields of health, economic and social development, leadership development, fellowship and diversity. SI Vista NCI holds luncheon meetings the first and third Friday of each month at Shadowridge Golf Club in Vista. For more information about Soroptimists, see our website at soroptimistvista.org or email us at soroptimistinternationalvista@gmail.com.

The North County San Diego Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative is a run as a program of service by Soroptimist International of Vista and North County Inland in partnership with the United Methodist Church of Vista. A diverse group of individuals, churches, non-profits and other community organizations, the Collaborative is committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve victim services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking. The Collaborative meets every other month (on the first Thursday of the month) at 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. at the United Methodist at 490 S. Melrose Drive, Vista, California. The event is free to the public, and coffee and pastries are served.

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September Collaborative Report

NORTH SAN DIEGO COUNTY HUMAN TRAFFICKING COLLABORATIVE
September 6, 2018
WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS, UPDATES, EVENTS

IMG_2189Legislative Update: The Sacramento legislative session is over and the surviving bills are now in the hands of Gov. Jerry Brown. He has already signed some measures into law, among them, a bill authored by San Diego Assemblyman Brian Malenschein, and co-authored by several other Assembly members, and sponsored by the San Diego County District Attorney’s office. The law allows for triple the damages a defendant would otherwise be liable for when the act is directed at more than one minor, when minors suffer physical, emotional or economic damage, or when the defendant knew or reasonably should have known that the sex victims was a minor. (Note: attached list of California State Trafficking bills – 2018)

Jacque Howard, United Methodist Church of Vista announced UMC Vista will host a League of Women Voters panel in the Fellowship Hall for discussion of issues on the November ballot at 10:45 a.m., on October 9th.

Kelly Steel, North Coast Calvary Chapel. Her church wants to become involved in the efforts to address the issues of sex trafficking.

Darrell Adamson, Screen Writer, is creating a feature film based in Southeast Asia about a group of Americans on a medical mission who stumble on a sex trafficking operation and decide to rescue victims. Currently, he awaits an option on his script. If that doesn’t occur, he will make it into a novel as a preliminary to a film.

Kaye Van Nevel, Soroptimist International of Vista & North County Inland shared that New Community Church is sponsoring a Golf Fundraiser with funds to go to Operation Hope, the year round homeless shelter in Vista. The date: Saturday, October 13, 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Boulder Oaks Golf Club, 10333 Meadow Glen Way E., Escondido, CA. Contact Kaye for more information.

Kaye also commends La Maestra Community Health Centers’ Legal Advocacy Human Trafficking Victim Assistance Program. Victim assistance is available Monday – Friday, 9-5, 4135 Fairmount Ave., San Diego.

Pat Spencer, novelist, announced her support of our work. Author of Story of a Stolen Girl, her book reveals the ease with which a young woman is ‘stolen,’ the super-human efforts of her mother who rescues her, and how the powerful international cartels control and use a recently available drug which renders victims totally compliant and erases all memory of abuse. http://patspencer.net.

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Kaye Van Nevel with guest speaker Joseph Travers

Guest Speaker Joseph Travers

Joseph Travers is the Founder and Executive Director of Saved In America. An Honorably Discharged Veteran from the United States Navy, Mr. Travers has a total of six years of experience in Law Enforcement, specifically in Criminal Investigations and Police Training and Supervision. He is also a Pastor for National Information Center.
He began his presentation with a brief video, the true story of a kidnapped girl and the concern of her parents. His team which tracks down and rescues missing children has a record of 95 out of 95! He described how he got involved, after a 2009 ministry, and read an article about the famous case of Brittanee Drexel, a 17-year-old who went missing in Florida in 2009 and was later found dead, after being gang raped.

Travers, who had worked narcotics in LA and got to know the gangs involved with the cartels, decided to form this rescue group using his knowledge. He partnered with US Navy Seals who were rescuing victims overseas. He wanted to do the same thing here in U.S. The first operation was in December 2014 these volunteers do not charge the clients who are parents seeking runaway/kidnapped children. All are licensed and insured Private Investigators so they can work with law enforcement, to ensure confidentiality with the parents, and they have an Attorney on staff. He said his “secret sauce” is “God brings the girls to us; we don’t find the girls.” He added that they are using very sophisticated surveillance equipment (including drones) and techniques to find out where the girls are being held and then they tell law enforcement where they are exactly so local law enforcement can get them. Said they themselves never have to touch anyone, it’s the gang/narcotics detectives that go in.

Some interesting factoids: 60% of the 95 girls his group rescued were foster kids.

Girls in places like Casa de Amparo in San Marcos are sometimes allowed to have cellphones they can use to call their pimps to pick them up for a “job” and bring them back to the shelter! Casa said they got no help from local law enforcement to prevent this, so Joseph’s group helped and successfully prevented 15 girls from being picked up by their pimp.

His group has prepared a one-hour lesson plan for Homeland Security. The Key to Success is when a child a child is reported as a runaway to get to her before the traffickers do. The first 48 hours are crucial; it’s a race against time. He said recruiters are in every high school and middle school. They are students themselves who are being groomed by gangs from a young age to target vulnerable girls. These young boys are called “pee wees” and are as young as 11. Travers said 40% of all runaways become trafficked. He said law enforcement must be retrained about how to handle missing persons’ reports.

Michelle Walsh, Coordinator of Student Services for Vista Unified School District commented that every runaway in her district is reported to her. There was discussion about the current law which does NOT allow minor victims to be detained for their own safety. The unintended consequence of no longer being able to put them in juvenile hall opens the door for release BACK to the streets where the predators grab them again.

Each rescue costs about $5500 per recovery. His group relies on donations and volunteers. “We have some really good equipment,” he said. They have a case manager for each case, and photos and video is preserved as evidence that can be used in court to sue the bad guys. The traffickers always plead poverty, but have cash hidden or own property, so now the homeowners of the property where girls are found can be sued.

This long awaited model is now being recognized and duplicated across the country. It comes from compassion, knowledge and expertise of one man who knows the goodness of others, and brings them together, and revives hope.

Present: Joseph Travers, Saved in America
Michelle Walsh, Coordinator Student Services, VUSD
Kaye Van Nevel, Jackie Piro Huyck, Karen Del Bene, Brenda Pacheco,
Soroptimist Int’l of Vista & North County Inland (SIVNCI)
Lisa Adams, Friends of the Park
Lauren Chin, Soroptimist International of Poway
Judy Horning, Soroptimist Int’l of Poway, S.T.A.T., BSCC
Terri Haskins, Susan Gubar, Joyce Odom, Soroptimist Int’l of Oceanside-Carlsbad
Lynn Flanagan, Soroptimist Int’l, North San Diego
Pam Warnock, Soroptimist Int’l, North San Diego, S.T.A.T., BSCC
Marianne Grisez, St. Thomas More Church
Donna Hubner, Educator
Terrie Nash, concerned citizen from Oceanside
Jacque Howard, United Methodist Women UMC, Vista
Karla Halvorson, Pastor, Lutheran Church, San Marcos
Stephanie Gonzalez, Program Coordinator, N.C. Lifeline, Project Life
Anne Harrison, Interest Individual
Jenny Root, Escondido author
Darrell Adamson, Lake San Marcos, independent screenwriter
Jacqui Howard, United Methodist Women
Pat Spencer, author, Story of a Stolen Girl

NEXT MEETING November 1, 2018

Speaker: Jamie Quient, Esq., President and Managing Attorney of Free to Thrive



The North San Diego County Human Trafficking Collaborative is a diverse group of individuals and community organizations committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking

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Joseph Travers to Speak at Sept. 6 Collaborative Meeting

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Joseph Travers

August 5, 2018 — Our next Collaborative meeting is Thursday, September 6 at 9 am at our usual location: United Methodist Church, 490 South Melrose Drive, Vista, California (downstairs, in Fellowship Hall). Our guest speaker is Joseph Travers, Executive Director for www.SavedInAmerica.org. He has assisted in the rescue of 39 young girls vulnerable to Child Sex Traffickers since 2014 and is the author of “Introduction to Private Investigation, Essential Knowledge and Procedures for the Private Investigator.”
An Honorably Discharged Veteran from the United States Navy, Mr. Travers has a total of six years of experience in Law Enforcement, specifically in Criminal Investigations and Police Training and Supervision.
Mr. Travers is a California State Licensed Investigator (www.PeoplesDetective.com), since 1984, and his investigative work has been chronicled in People magazine, various cable networks, and on television stations such as CBS, NBC, ABC, KTTV, KCOP, KHJ, KTLA, San Diego 10, HBO VICE, and the TV movie and series Renegade.
Mr. Travers has been a Police Commissioner for the City of Oceanside, California since 2008. He is also a Pastor for National Christian Information Center, Incorporated: http://www.NcicInc.com, and ministers on a Harley Davidson Motorcycle as founder of “Born Again-The Way” Christian Motorcycle Ministry http://www.BiblesForMarines.com. He serves as a Licensed Investigator and Educator with his son, Joshua, http://www.CIAInvestigationAcademy.com.

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Collaborative News for May

The North County San Diego Human Trafficking Collaborative met on May 3, 2018. Our guest speaker was Stephanie Gonzalez. Here is a recap of the meeting.

WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS, UPDATES, EVENTS

  • Terri Haskins, SIV Oceanside/Carlsbad announced several upcoming film showings/fundraisers:

    Lunafest 2018 (9 short films for and by women) at Carlsbad Dove Library, 1775 Dove Lane, Carlsbad, this Sunday, May 06, 2018 at 2:00 PM. For more information about this fundraiser for Soroptimist Int. Oceanside/Carlsbad, see sioceansidecarlsbad.com. Tickets $30.

    Terri will host a second run of the Lunafest films “Take Two! Night Party” in her back yard theatre for those who missed the Dove Library Event, May 18, 6:30, $30, food and drink included.

    Terri will also host the double feature, Tricked and Indoctrinated on June 22, again in her backyard. Food will be served at this free event for all ages. Jaimee Johnson will speak. RSVP for all ‘BackYard’ events 760-415-1886

    AND, on July 13, at 6:30 she will show “Kinky Boots”.

  • Charity Brant, YMCA Outreach Coordinator, Youth and Family Services, Transitional Housing and Youth Development announced a recently secured contract to create housing for young adults 12-25 who are homeless. They currently use Drop In Center, but look forward to opening a semi-permanent shelter.
  • Kaye announced Grace House, which offers extended shelter and wrap-around services for 6 adult women survivors of trafficking will gratefully accept donations to continue maintain their home. She added that a $2500 check from a personal project of Soroptimist Cherie Wilson SI, Vista and North County Inland was recently presented to Susan Johnson, director and founder of Alabaster Jar Project.
  • Kaye encouraged the attendees to print and distribute the HT Poster produced by San Diego Count DA’s office. They have been placed in mandated locations (bars, workplaces, etc.) but are needed in any and all public places, such as transit stations, schools, churches, retail sales.
  • Legislation: All bills must be out of their house of origin by June 1 to survive. Many of these are already in their second house. If they survive the second house, they will go to the governor. The federal bill SB1865 has passed which makes web platforms liable for the content on them (currently they are not), as in Back Page, which is finally closed.
  • Jacque Howard, United Methodist Church of Vista announced that United Methodist Church of Vista will be hosting speakers from the League of Women Voters in the Fellowship Hall, May 15 at 11 am.  She also encouraged organizations seeking grants from the United Methodist Cable Grant need to get their applications in by May 25. Applications are online at: outreach@umcvista.org. Also attached is an e-mail with instructions.

GUEST SPEAKER Stephanie Gonzalez: Case Manager and the Program Coordinator for North County Lifeline’s “Project Life,” which supports victims of sex trafficking with immediate crisis management, basic need, advocacy, and trauma-informed, comprehensive case management that creates a path to self-reliance.

Since 2011, North County Lifeline, Project Life has helped 128+ survivors of Human Trafficking. One of critical ways they assist victims is to direct them to the resources and find them shelter, etc., without requiring a retelling of their story over and over again, which re-traumatizes them.

Stephanie told us North County Lifeline received a grant for helping LGBTQ community as it relates to sex trafficking in partnership with North County LGBTQ Resource Center. She said services for this subset of victims “looks different” from services to others. Another similar grant helps them partner with organizations like BSCC, Generate HOPE, San Diego Youth Services and others to come up with “best practices for all victims” of human trafficking.

She said it’s more difficult for men and boys who are victimized to come forward and there are no services just for men and boys, with minimal research data on them. Age of entry into sex trafficking for boys is typically 11-13, recruited by “friends”, and unwilling to come forward to protect them. Activist and former victim Tom Jones had 30-35 male victims he was helping, but he would commonly only talk to them via phone and email, because they didn’t want to be identified. More than half of the porn viewed by adult men involves boys. Johns are usually white upper-middle-class working professionals. One survey said that 75% of all males have experienced some form of sexual abuse. Statistically men keep quiet for an average of 20 years before they come forward. For instance after being victimized, Tom Jones actually thought he might be gay even though he was not. Men are more prone to distrust authority figures and not want to get their friends in trouble, who are complicit and got them involved initially.

Stephanie said the “male” victims she has seen are trans-gender, “trans”, (men who identify as women and are transitioning to female). rarely, the reverse. Their susceptibility to continue in the trafficked life is connected to the need for hormone replacement in the trans-gender process.

Recent example: Trans woman (formerly male), from El Salvador, at age 13 kicked out of her home first identified herself as gay male, then wanted to transition, was recruited by a friend, became a prostitute to gain money for hormone therapy. Gangs in beat her, broke her back and knees. She left for Mexico, by herself, and was quickly approached by a guy who said “I can help you.” He bought her nice things, took her on a cruise and once they got to Tijuana he said “Okay pay me back” and he put her to work. Then a john helped her escape, he dropped her off at the US border, she was in a dress and heels. An agent took her to the Detention Center for 10 months until she got released. There she was subject to harassment by officers and residents of the facility. She finally was granted asylum this month and will get a work permit, Medi-Cal, and $300+ per month. She lives currently in a Lifeline shelter. But it is very hard for trans-gender individuals to find jobs.

Charity Brant of YMCA outreach said she has seen more and more male to female trans-gender who are homeless. No female to male – less need for hormones for them, less visibility, more social support generally among women who are transitioning to men.

Of great interest to everyone present was Stephanie’s statement that undocumented aliens, if they are being trafficked, need not fear deportation. On the contrary, their victimization means they are eligible to obtain a form I-94 which gives them a legal status as “Continued Presence” but they need to cooperate with law enforcement. This only applies if the abuse occurs in the U.S. Stephanie said they can either call her Intake Line which goes directly to her: 760-842-6526. If after hours, just call police department and they can contact her. In response to a question, Stephanie said the current administration in Washington has created “a lot of fear” among her clients, even though they have their papers. She emphasized that law enforcement is “great” in these situations, puts the victims at ease. They typically give the victim their card and say if Border Patrol questions you have them call us.

NEXT MEETING is September 6 (no meeting in July). Speaker TBD.


The North San Diego County Human Trafficking Collaborative is a diverse group of individuals and community organizations committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking

 

 

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Stephanie Gonzalez to Speak at Collaborative May 3

April 28, 2018, Vista, CA Stephanie Gonzalez, Case Manager and Program Director, Project Life, North County Lifeline has graciously agreed to step in for Jonathan King-Cretot, who was originally scheduled to speak, but is unable to attend.
Stephanie will update us on North County Lifeline’s multiple service projects. All are welcome to join us at 9 a.m. at United Methodist Church, 490 S. Melrose, Vista, Fellowship Hall (downstairs).

The North San Diego County Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative is a diverse group of individuals and community organizations committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking.
Our bi-monthly Collaborative Meetings are held from 9 am to 10:30 am in the at the Church’s Fellowship Hall (lower level) at 490 S. Melrose Drive, Vista. Admission is free and all are welcome. Complimentary coffee and pastries will be available.
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Local Movie Screenings March 4 and March 8

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“Women Like Us” will be shown Sunday, March 4 at 3 pm at the Oceanside Regal theater for $10. The director of the movie will be present to speak about her film. “SOLD” will be shown free of charge at Palomar … Continue reading

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