Joseph Travers to Speak at Sept. 6 Collaborative Meeting

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Joseph Travers

August 5, 2018 — Our next Collaborative meeting is Thursday, September 6 at 9 am at our usual location: United Methodist Church, 490 South Melrose Drive, Vista, California (downstairs, in Fellowship Hall). Our guest speaker is Joseph Travers, Executive Director for www.SavedInAmerica.org. He has assisted in the rescue of 39 young girls vulnerable to Child Sex Traffickers since 2014 and is the author of “Introduction to Private Investigation, Essential Knowledge and Procedures for the Private Investigator.”
An Honorably Discharged Veteran from the United States Navy, Mr. Travers has a total of six years of experience in Law Enforcement, specifically in Criminal Investigations and Police Training and Supervision.
Mr. Travers is a California State Licensed Investigator (www.PeoplesDetective.com), since 1984, and his investigative work has been chronicled in People magazine, various cable networks, and on television stations such as CBS, NBC, ABC, KTTV, KCOP, KHJ, KTLA, San Diego 10, HBO VICE, and the TV movie and series Renegade.
Mr. Travers has been a Police Commissioner for the City of Oceanside, California since 2008. He is also a Pastor for National Christian Information Center, Incorporated: http://www.NcicInc.com, and ministers on a Harley Davidson Motorcycle as founder of “Born Again-The Way” Christian Motorcycle Ministry http://www.BiblesForMarines.com. He serves as a Licensed Investigator and Educator with his son, Joshua, http://www.CIAInvestigationAcademy.com.

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Collaborative News for May

The North County San Diego Human Trafficking Collaborative met on May 3, 2018. Our guest speaker was Stephanie Gonzalez. Here is a recap of the meeting.

WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS, UPDATES, EVENTS

  • Terri Haskins, SIV Oceanside/Carlsbad announced several upcoming film showings/fundraisers:

    Lunafest 2018 (9 short films for and by women) at Carlsbad Dove Library, 1775 Dove Lane, Carlsbad, this Sunday, May 06, 2018 at 2:00 PM. For more information about this fundraiser for Soroptimist Int. Oceanside/Carlsbad, see sioceansidecarlsbad.com. Tickets $30.

    Terri will host a second run of the Lunafest films “Take Two! Night Party” in her back yard theatre for those who missed the Dove Library Event, May 18, 6:30, $30, food and drink included.

    Terri will also host the double feature, Tricked and Indoctrinated on June 22, again in her backyard. Food will be served at this free event for all ages. Jaimee Johnson will speak. RSVP for all ‘BackYard’ events 760-415-1886

    AND, on July 13, at 6:30 she will show “Kinky Boots”.

  • Charity Brant, YMCA Outreach Coordinator, Youth and Family Services, Transitional Housing and Youth Development announced a recently secured contract to create housing for young adults 12-25 who are homeless. They currently use Drop In Center, but look forward to opening a semi-permanent shelter.
  • Kaye announced Grace House, which offers extended shelter and wrap-around services for 6 adult women survivors of trafficking will gratefully accept donations to continue maintain their home. She added that a $2500 check from a personal project of Soroptimist Cherie Wilson SI, Vista and North County Inland was recently presented to Susan Johnson, director and founder of Alabaster Jar Project.
  • Kaye encouraged the attendees to print and distribute the HT Poster produced by San Diego Count DA’s office. They have been placed in mandated locations (bars, workplaces, etc.) but are needed in any and all public places, such as transit stations, schools, churches, retail sales.
  • Legislation: All bills must be out of their house of origin by June 1 to survive. Many of these are already in their second house. If they survive the second house, they will go to the governor. The federal bill SB1865 has passed which makes web platforms liable for the content on them (currently they are not), as in Back Page, which is finally closed.
  • Jacque Howard, United Methodist Church of Vista announced that United Methodist Church of Vista will be hosting speakers from the League of Women Voters in the Fellowship Hall, May 15 at 11 am.  She also encouraged organizations seeking grants from the United Methodist Cable Grant need to get their applications in by May 25. Applications are online at: outreach@umcvista.org. Also attached is an e-mail with instructions.

GUEST SPEAKER Stephanie Gonzalez: Case Manager and the Program Coordinator for North County Lifeline’s “Project Life,” which supports victims of sex trafficking with immediate crisis management, basic need, advocacy, and trauma-informed, comprehensive case management that creates a path to self-reliance.

Since 2011, North County Lifeline, Project Life has helped 128+ survivors of Human Trafficking. One of critical ways they assist victims is to direct them to the resources and find them shelter, etc., without requiring a retelling of their story over and over again, which re-traumatizes them.

Stephanie told us North County Lifeline received a grant for helping LGBTQ community as it relates to sex trafficking in partnership with North County LGBTQ Resource Center. She said services for this subset of victims “looks different” from services to others. Another similar grant helps them partner with organizations like BSCC, Generate HOPE, San Diego Youth Services and others to come up with “best practices for all victims” of human trafficking.

She said it’s more difficult for men and boys who are victimized to come forward and there are no services just for men and boys, with minimal research data on them. Age of entry into sex trafficking for boys is typically 11-13, recruited by “friends”, and unwilling to come forward to protect them. Activist and former victim Tom Jones had 30-35 male victims he was helping, but he would commonly only talk to them via phone and email, because they didn’t want to be identified. More than half of the porn viewed by adult men involves boys. Johns are usually white upper-middle-class working professionals. One survey said that 75% of all males have experienced some form of sexual abuse. Statistically men keep quiet for an average of 20 years before they come forward. For instance after being victimized, Tom Jones actually thought he might be gay even though he was not. Men are more prone to distrust authority figures and not want to get their friends in trouble, who are complicit and got them involved initially.

Stephanie said the “male” victims she has seen are trans-gender, “trans”, (men who identify as women and are transitioning to female). rarely, the reverse. Their susceptibility to continue in the trafficked life is connected to the need for hormone replacement in the trans-gender process.

Recent example: Trans woman (formerly male), from El Salvador, at age 13 kicked out of her home first identified herself as gay male, then wanted to transition, was recruited by a friend, became a prostitute to gain money for hormone therapy. Gangs in beat her, broke her back and knees. She left for Mexico, by herself, and was quickly approached by a guy who said “I can help you.” He bought her nice things, took her on a cruise and once they got to Tijuana he said “Okay pay me back” and he put her to work. Then a john helped her escape, he dropped her off at the US border, she was in a dress and heels. An agent took her to the Detention Center for 10 months until she got released. There she was subject to harassment by officers and residents of the facility. She finally was granted asylum this month and will get a work permit, Medi-Cal, and $300+ per month. She lives currently in a Lifeline shelter. But it is very hard for trans-gender individuals to find jobs.

Charity Brant of YMCA outreach said she has seen more and more male to female trans-gender who are homeless. No female to male – less need for hormones for them, less visibility, more social support generally among women who are transitioning to men.

Of great interest to everyone present was Stephanie’s statement that undocumented aliens, if they are being trafficked, need not fear deportation. On the contrary, their victimization means they are eligible to obtain a form I-94 which gives them a legal status as “Continued Presence” but they need to cooperate with law enforcement. This only applies if the abuse occurs in the U.S. Stephanie said they can either call her Intake Line which goes directly to her: 760-842-6526. If after hours, just call police department and they can contact her. In response to a question, Stephanie said the current administration in Washington has created “a lot of fear” among her clients, even though they have their papers. She emphasized that law enforcement is “great” in these situations, puts the victims at ease. They typically give the victim their card and say if Border Patrol questions you have them call us.

NEXT MEETING is September 6 (no meeting in July). Speaker TBD.


The North San Diego County Human Trafficking Collaborative is a diverse group of individuals and community organizations committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking

 

 

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Stephanie Gonzalez to Speak at Collaborative May 3

April 28, 2018, Vista, CA Stephanie Gonzalez, Case Manager and Program Director, Project Life, North County Lifeline has graciously agreed to step in for Jonathan King-Cretot, who was originally scheduled to speak, but is unable to attend.
Stephanie will update us on North County Lifeline’s multiple service projects. All are welcome to join us at 9 a.m. at United Methodist Church, 490 S. Melrose, Vista, Fellowship Hall (downstairs).

The North San Diego County Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative is a diverse group of individuals and community organizations committed to eliminate human trafficking and modern day slavery. Our mission is to raise awareness of human trafficking, provide a platform to share information, improve services, educate ourselves and the public, and advocate for policy and legislation related to human trafficking.
Our bi-monthly Collaborative Meetings are held from 9 am to 10:30 am in the at the Church’s Fellowship Hall (lower level) at 490 S. Melrose Drive, Vista. Admission is free and all are welcome. Complimentary coffee and pastries will be available.
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Local Movie Screenings March 4 and March 8

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“Women Like Us” will be shown Sunday, March 4 at 3 pm at the Oceanside Regal theater for $10. The director of the movie will be present to speak about her film. “SOLD” will be shown free of charge at Palomar … Continue reading

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March Collaborative Report

March 4, 2018–The NORTH SAN DIEGO COUNTY anti-HUMAN TRAFFICKING COLLABORATIVE met on Thursday, March 1, 2018: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Guest Speaker: Trish Martinez

Introductions and Announcements

*Jacque Howard (United Methodist Church) announced their Bake Sale Fundraiser March 17th at the Vista Farmers Market by the Courthouse.
*Teri Haskins (Soroptimists Oceanside/Carlsbad) announced the showing of “Women Like Us” Sunday, March 4 at 3pm at the Oceanside Regal theater for $10. The director of the movie will be present to speak about her film. Also Teri is hosting a free screening of “Indoctrinated” in her backyard on June 22. (More info to come)
*Olivia Navarro plans to open an emergency shelter for trafficking survivors.
*Lisa Adams announced “Friends of the Park” (Kaysee and Norio Morota, Church of Christ) will be serving warm meals at Magee Park in Carlsbad every Sunday morning. There is need for volunteer servers.
*Penny Harrington compiled and distributed the current list of legislative bills related to human trafficking. Look for the attached list, specifically the Federal Bill H.R. 1865, the last one. ACTION: Please call our U.S. Senators and urge them to do what they can to bring H.R. 1865 to the floor quickly and support the bill. Sen. Kamala Harris: Phone (202) 224-3553; also contact: Deputy Chief rohini_kosoglu@harris.senate.gov; General Counsel josh_hsu@harris.senate.gov Sen. Dianne Feinstein: Phone (202) 224-3841 Also contact: Leg. Director: roscoe_jones@feinstein.senate.gov; Leg. Aide ellen_baron@feinstein.senate.gov
*Jackie Huyck announced Soroptimist Annual Salad Luncheon fundraiser on April 12  from 11:30 to 1:30 at Grace Church, 1450 E. Vista Way in Vista. $15 in advance/$18 at door See soroptimistvista.org
* Kaye Van Nevel announced the free screening of the documentary, SOLD at Palomar College, March 8, 5:30-8, in the Governing Board Room.

Next meeting of the Collaborative will be Thursday, May 3, 2018 at 9 am

Guest Speaker Presentation: Trish Martinez

Trish Martinez is a Diegueno and Yaqui Native American and is a member of the Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians of San Diego County. An integral member of the San Diego Human Trafficking/CSEC Advisory Council she is a valuable resource for awareness in the Native communities throughout the southwest region. She was appointed to the San Diego County Advisory Council as Native Liaison. Her advocacy achieved an international reach when she spoke at the March 2017 United Nations 61st Commission on the Status of Women: Human Trafficking in Native Country, which she shared at our meeting.

She looked back at the history of systemic Indian genocide starting with colonization and Christopher Columbus’s diaries in which he talks about “Handlers” (i.e. Traffickers) and also the explorer Hernando de Soto who claimed Florida for Spain and who had “Porters” procuring Indian “Comfort Women” for his men. Trish explained how subsequent laws have created tribal areas that still lack the resources and support for proper law enforcement and prosecution for these crimes.

In 1860 a completely negative experience was forced on Indian children when the Bureau of Indian Affairs established the first Indian boarding school which aimed to assimilate the Indian children into the mainstream. If the initial idea held any positive outcome, the Indian culture was totally ignored and parents were excluded from their children.

She talked about the “Man Camps” of today formed in the wake of the oil boom, on tribal property. As an example, in North Dakota, over 100,000 men from outside the state moved in to work and live in man camps established by the oil companies. As a result, drugs, domestic violence and sexual assault, including rape and sex trafficking to many Native Americans living there have skyrocketed. But local law enforcement was slow, if ever to respond.

Currently there is progress being made educating hotel workers and casinos as they train all workers to recognize and report the signs of human trafficking. New employees have to sign a form saying they will not partake of trafficking and will be aware of it and report if they see it happening. The multitude of Indian Casinos has opened more doors for exploitation. Fortunately, in California, hotel staff is trained to be observant to the signs of human trafficking, particularly in those casinos with attached hotels and multi-leveled parking structures.

Trish is now part of a worldwide movement with other anti-trafficking advocacy groups focused on gender equality, decent work, economic growth, peace, justice and strong institutions.

Attendance:
Penny Harrington, California Legislative Analyst
Tom Coxon, Research Analyst
Olivia Navarro, Shining Stars and Alabaster Jar Project
Jacque Howard, United Methodist Women, UMC Vista
Charity Brant, Mary and Joe Mottino, YMCA, Director of Youth Services
Teri Haskins, Oceanside/Carlsbad (Soroptimist International of Oceanside/Carlsbad)
Judy Horning, Soroptimist International of Poway, S.T.A.T., BSCC
Pam Warnock, Soroptimist International of North San Diego, S.T.A.T.
Lisa Adams, Activist
Christina Rangel, Interested Individual
Kaye Van Nevel, Marge Swacker, Allison Metzler and Jackie Huyck, Soroptimist International of Vista & North County Inland

 

 

 

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Trish Martinez to speak at March 1 Collaborative Meeting

HTCollaborativeNEWBannerSmallThe next meeting of the North County San Diego Anti-Human Trafficking Collaborative is Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 9 am. As always the meeting is free, open to the public, and coffee and pastries will be available.

Our Guest Speaker is Trish Martinez. Martinez is a Diegueno and Yaqui Native American and is a member of the Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians of San Diego County.

She is an integral member of the San Diego Human Trafficking/CSEC Advisory Council and has become a valuable resource for awareness in the Native communities throughout the southwest region. She was appointed to the San Diego County Advisory Council as Native Liaison.

Her advocacy achieved an international reach when she spoke at the March 2017 United Nations 61st Commission on the Status of Women: Human Trafficking in Native Country.
Trish is now part of a worldwide movement with other anti-trafficking advocacy groups focused on gender equality, decent work, economic growth, peace, justice and strong institutions.

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Screening of “SOLD” March 8 at Palomar College

poster-sold-e1441589751289Screening Followed by Panel Discussion

WHEN: Thursday, March 8, 2018 from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm
WHERE: Palomar College, 1140 W. Mission Rd., San Marcos, in the Governing Board Room. This is a free event and open to the public.

Hosted by: Soroptimists Together Against Trafficking; Soroptimist International of Vista & North County Inland and the Palomar College Philosophy Club. Palomar President Joi Lin Blake will give opening remarks.

SOLD is a narrative, feature film adaptation of the globally acclaimed novel by Patricia McCormick. Based on true stories, SOLD is the story of Lakshmi, who journeys from a pastoral, rural village in Nepal to a gritty brothel/prison called Happiness House in Kolkata, India. Through one extraordinary girl’s story, SOLD illustrates the brutality of child trafficking, which affects millions of children around the globe every year. Globally the average age of a trafficked girl is thirteen, the same age as the girl in the film. SOLD is a call to action, and a testament to the power and resilience of the human spirit.

SOLD is directed by Academy and Emmy award-winner, Jeffrey D. Brown, Executive Produced by two time Academy Award winner, Emma Thompson, Produced by Jane Charles, Co-Produced by Katie Mustard and Written by Joseph Kwong and Jeffrey D. Brown

Guest Speakers:

Kaye Van Nevel, Soroptimist International of Vista & North County Inland

Jaimee Johnson is the founder of Sisters of the Streets, which focuses on empowering and encouraging young girls and women to find their passions and life outside of the “adult” industry. Jaimee is an active peer support specialist with North County Lifeline’s “Project Life.”  Her goal is to share her personal experience so others may relate and find hope in their own lives.

Elizabeth Camarena, Esq. is Associate Director at Casa Cornelia Law Center in San Diego. CCLC is a non-profit law firm which provides quality pro bono legal services to approximately 2,000 victims of human and civil rights violations each year. Elizabeth oversees its legal programs which serve individuals fleeing persecution and torture, victims of human trafficking, and children in need of humanitarian protection in the United States.

 

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